Road Trip with the Boys

From the top of the South Island one weekend to Bottom of the Queensland (Aus) the next! Thursday lunchtime I headed away from work to catch a flight to Brisbane for some orienteering at the Australian Champs. Nick Hann and I were on the same flight and arrived in Brisbane with the task of finding Nick Collins, a man neither of us knew yet, but another orienteer none the less. Half of the fun of these orienteering trips is actually working out the logistics of getting from A to B and back again, and of course there is some large scale navigation involved.

We made our way to the Domestic terminal and located what looked to be our rendezvous point. No sign of Nick. We referred back to our instructions, “…a man slightly taller than me (Rob Garden), with whitish hair…” Great that could be half of the people here in the terminal! After some waiting we discovered that actually there was another Thrifty counter, and sure enough we spotted Nick, and our Road trip began. Just south of Stanthorpe was approximately 3 hours drive away, it was still quite early Queensland time but getting quite late NZ time, and several hours since my Sausage roll 5 hours earlier in Christchurch airport. Shortly after getting out of the city we managed a stop at a very random little strip mall for some “authentic” Italian Pizza. Then it seemed like hours of driving through a couple of pretty heavy thunderstorms as I drifted in and out of sleep, before we arrived at the house. The others arrived in Brisbane a bit later, so left a bit later but I was well asleep and pretty much out to it when they got in.

Waiting/searching for Nick Collins

Waiting/searching for Nick Collins

The Granite Belt, a nice place to stay... especially if you are into wine apparently, or Orienteering!

The Granite Belt, a nice place to stay… especially if you are into wine apparently, or Orienteering!

Day 1, we were all up early, the three hour time difference saw to that and headed into town for some bacon and eggs, prior to having a hit out on the training map. My main concern about orienteering at this time of the year in Australia was the presence of snakes, however it was actually bloody cold around where we were, and it was almost tempting to go out there in a polypro! Once underway however, things warmed up and I did my own thing while Matt and Nick smashed out the controls in record time. It didn’t actually take me too long to get into the map which surprised me a bit. It was terrain sort of a bit like Naseby, where you can use clumps of features to act as handrails and ignore the individual features until you are into the control circle. My biggest surprise of the day was how quickly the features came up especially on a 1:15,000 map, I guess the terrain, when clear allowed for nice running. I enjoyed my little run around, but it wasn’t anything too exciting so I was pretty happy to hear that the next two days were much more interesting with a lot more bear open rock patches, typical of the so called Granite Belt.

Saturday brought on the long distance event. It would be fair to say I wasn’t quite as excited as I needed or wanted to be, which was pretty difficult with Nick and Matt around living and breathing orienteering, chomping a the bit to be unleashed on the course. I wandered off to the start, not realising that I had to wear a GPS tracker… We had to wait in the start boxes for such a long time I was starting to get bored waiting. Not good. As soon as I turned the map over I managed to switch my brain on though and with a fairly conservative approach, I had a good run through until about 15 where it all fell apart. I lost a bit of focus, got confused, panicked a bit and made a large mistake. From here on in, things went from bad to worse, and soon enough my somewhat solid (but slow) run had turned into a complete nightmare.

Devon punching a control (Facebook)

Devon punching a control (Facebook)

Bare Rock in the forest (Facebook)

Bare Rock in the forest (Facebook)

Things didn’t go much better in the middle distance the next day. Again very exciting and challenging terrain but I think the lack of practise in this terrain, and a lack of orienteering practise all round, combined with no speed work for around 6 months disadvantaged me somewhat. Combining all of that with low confidence after the long distance, it wasnt long into the race that I made another huge mistake, followed by another… somehow I managed to latch onto another runner on my course to get me around the final few controls and finish before the big guns all came in….just.

Part two of the road trip was now ahead of us, 3 hours in the car back to Brisbane to catch our flight. There was little room for error, and pretty much no time for stopping. But a little too much time for looking out the window (since I slept and it was dark on the way up) and reflection… I really enjoyed the actual orienteering on the trip, I enjoyed the trip, but was very disappointed and fairly embarrassed with my performance. It has been a rough road through the middle of this year for me, coming back from surgery has set me back a bit, even though it was only my wrist, the time off and the hesitation that comes with sub-consciously protecting it has slowed me down a bit. Also it appears there has been a change in my motivation levels towards orienteering. I still want to orienteer, I still enjoy it, but I am left wondering if its really something that I want to pour a whole lot of time and energy into it to get the results I wish I could achieve. I guess time will tell. I am pretty excited about my next and up coming challenge so some of the fire  at least, is still there!

 

 

 

Road Trip with the Girls

North of Nelson on the West Coast is a place I haven’t actually spent too much time exploring and I have been on the look out to go check it out sometime. Unfortunately for the El Equipo Spring Challenge Team (Lara, Georgia and Emily) they were down a regular support crew member as (Riki had shirked his responsibilities and gone to a stag party in Queenstown), so I jumped in, in his place. It wasn’t too hard to convince me, especially when bribed with a shuttle and the chance to ride the Rameka track on the way there!

Since I had to take a day of work I was pretty keen to maximise my “holiday” and headed away Thursday night with Matt and Lara. We camped overnight at Marble Hill which had not yet filled with Freedom campers for the season, and instead was awoken by “Tane, look out! the baby weka are going to attack your tent!”

Baby Weka!

Baby Weka!

We had a leisurely start to the day, a goat was sighted in the back of a car in Murchison and lunch at the Riwaka resurgence before jumping on our bikes at the top of Takaka Hill. Here we meet up with Rob who was going to ride alone but gladly joined with us. The track was very cool, heaps of fun, but almost a little bit challenging for a Hard tail. The Kennett brothers extension tracks were also a very exciting addition to the end of the ride. Some of the corners on one of the trails was a little bit much for me and had to walk a few. A slight navigational/land use issue caused by Matt sent us on an extra little road bash before we managed to find Lara. Our fun over for the day it was now time to do some serious work….

River just below the Riwaka Resurgence

River just below the Riwaka Resurgence

The Sunset after a brilliant activity day for Matt and I

The Sunset after a brilliant activity day for Matt and I

Its surprisingly easy to get up at 4am for a race as support crew, I guess having been on the other side of the coin before, you know what it feel like so to not have to be nervous and ready to fire it can be quite a lot less stressful…. however this did not mean that we could rest on our laurels, to get anything wrong in transition is something that no-one wants to have to face! The sunrise was not anything special unfortunately as rain was forecast later in the day. Not ideal for us standing around waiting at the transitions. The girls were pretty speedy off the raft and we had to be too, to pack up and move to the next transition. I think the support crew next to us was left a bit speechless and very impressed the speed and with our efforts in the whirlwind of activity.

The Devils Boots. The girls came through here on their bikes later in the day

The Devils Boots. The girls came through here on their bikes later in the day

Next transition the rain came, and by the time we got to the 3rd it was bucketing down. Luckily there was a reasonably covered spot at the cafe nearby we could hang out in. The final transition was a joint one with 6 hour teams and it was in a cow paddock, wet and very muddy! Nice to see the girls out going hard despite the average conditions however not too much fun for us, especially picking up the muddy (+ cow shit), wet bikes….

Along the beach and into the finish

Along the beach and into the finish

It was a close finish, to a see saw battle between three of the top teams. Unfortunately for Georgia, Lara and Emily they ended up just being edged out into second place by 54 seconds. Georgia’s race report is here. In the 6 hour race, Isla and Hilary had to also make a bit of a come back from the bike section and coincidentally finished in second place of their race, only a few minutes after the others.

I had itchy feet once we were back to the house, but since the race was over we were allowed to have our own little mission and headed out for a run, right out by Farewell Spit. It was a very cool desolate looking place, and the track runs right up along side some big cliff’s around Cape Farewell. Eventually it started to get quite dark and we cut back along the road just as it got dark and started to rain hard. Quite a unique end to a really cool little run.

It rained all night, and it was a bit of a mud pug at the prize giving tent. Faced with a long prize giving, and a long drive back to Christchurch, I was able to sneak out for another quick run along the beach, timed to perfection. I was pretty glad to have got out running when I did, because the entire drive home it was raining on and off!

Southern Raid on Rotoiti

As the Southerly passed through the South Island on a blustery Wednesday night, it dumped a good amount of snow on the mountains. This made for a cold and wet night of picking up controls from the Night Nav! By Friday night the roads through the mountains were open again allowing us to get to St Arnard for a freezing cold night in a freezing cold holiday house. It got so cold overnight I had to get up early and light the fire!

The sun arrived reasonably early and things began to warm up enough to venture outside. When we did however the day was all on. Nick went early on his road bike to catch Brent riding in from Nelson; Georgia, Lara and I jumped on our Mountain Bikes and rode one of the trails one the hills behind St Arnard to the Red Hills hut, and the other 3 climbed up to Parachute rocks.

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The beginning of the snow biking

The view from the top (pic. Emily Kelly)

The view from the top (pic. Emily Kelly)

There was quite a bit of snow on the tops which made for some cool riding…. excuse the pun. As we started to descend there was a chorus of squealing brakes, and a lot of slipping and sliding. I in fact took a bit of a forward tumble which saw the bike land on top of me and some delicate extraction was required. There was some very nice technical riding couple with a very smooth downhill back to home base.

By the time we had made it back to the house, Brent, Nick and Emily had moved onto there next activities, while the others we sitting back doing some study. There was just enough time for a quick lunch before the itchy-ness of the fine weather caused us to get moving again. Before we knew it we were all on the water in various watercraft. Our motley crew of 5 explored the top half of the Buller river for an exciting ride down around about 2-3km of pleasant rapids.

Getting ready for exploring the Buller river (pic. Emily Kelly)

Getting ready for exploring the Buller river (pic. Emily Kelly)

By the time we reached the house again the sun was going down, but this evening the house was roasting hot, perfect preparation for the purpose we were actually all there for the Wily Weka rogaine!

Gear explosion after and action packed activity day

Gear explosion after and action packed activity day… I counted 18 pairs of shoes!

Sunday morning was again a very cold start, but once we were underway in the rogaine, this was quickly forgotten. Brent’s efforts to wear Nick out the day before didn’t quite go to plan and nick was on fire for the first few hours. I was a little more conservative, but still was pushing pretty hard. It came clear quite early on that clocking the course was definitely on, especially being out the back end of the course with 4 hours still to go. 2.5 hours down we passed Brent and Dan, who also looked like they were moving pretty quick.

A small fire was lit under Nick when we reached West bay and we absolutely smoked the orienteering controls…. well Nick did, I was just hanging on as best I could. Around 3.5 hours in the fatigue was finally starting to slow Nick down a bit causing a little bit of brain fade too, and almost a punch up on course with some less than obliging 3 hour competitors!

I felt it was my job here to keep the pressure on Nick as we headed around the bay to the last few controls. Things were going well until we got a bit stumped on one control that was not quite in the right place and we just completely didn’t find it even after going back to where it should have been on the map and taking a photo. Oh well, we didn’t have time to muck around, so we moved on and smashed out the last few controls, finishing up 45 mins early with basically all the controls, but most importantly the win under our belts.

This wasn’t quite the end of the story however, Nick is a competitor and so am I to be honest so we headed to the planner to discuss the mysterious control we went past but did not see. Both parties left the discussion dis-satisfied, which did kind of leave a bit of a bad taste in our mouths after all we had just collected pretty much all the controls, covered 46km and finished 45mins early to take the win!

Georgia, Lara and Em did a good job in the women’s grade, also winning followed by Sophie and Sonia in second place. So a pretty good job all around for the Southerly Storm! An awesome weekend, awesome weather, awesome place, awesome results…. cant get much better than that!

http://nelsonorienteeringclub.weebly.com/wily-weka-challenge.html

Skiing+Orienteering +MTBing in Tekapo

The days, weeks and months have been flying by and its already a month since I was in Tekapo for a weekend of fun activities all in aid of Orienteering….

Saturday, after a late Friday night arrival was spent out Skiing at Roundhill. First (hopefully not the last…) day skiing for the year. There wasn’t a huge amount of snow, so we were confined to the lower slopes, so we made the most of our lift passes and managed a good few short runs. 4pm and the ski field closure time rolled around all too quickly!

Roundhill skiing

Roundhill skiing

Sunday started with orienteering in some fairly cold conditions. I took on board some points from the evening discussion and focused on enjoying myself, which meant letting Nick go when he came past me. Carsten unfortunately just sneaked in front of me at the finish too. Oh well, since Georgia and I had carted Mountain Bikes up to Tekapo we now had to use them, so there was time for a quick bike ride around the track we had just run on. It was enough to make me feel a bit fatigued, so a trip to the hot pools afterwards was the perfect way to end the weekend.

Norwest Arch above the lake

Norwest Arch above the lake

Road trip in the Outback

I reckon one of the coolest things about racing overseas is that you end up going to really interesting places that are somewhat off the beaten tourist trails. Alice Springs and Uluru are not entirely off the beaten track, but since we were in the area is seemed silly not to check it out. Armed with our rental car and two free days, we dragged ourselves out of bed the morning after the race and hit the road.

I sort of figured that Uluru was just down the road from Alice Springs.  Some actual research (after booking flights of course) revealed it is in fact a short way down the road… but a short way in Aussie Outback terms so just under 500km! Once on the main road out of town the road signs definitely indicated the massive distances between places in the Northern Territory, “Adelaide 1563km” and another icon of the Outback, Road Trains. The 130km/hr speed limit helped us cover the vast and flat scenery quickly and before long another cultural experience awaited us. We stopped off at a roadside stop, Road Trains, trucks, tourists, 4WD’ers were all here filling up on food and petrol. Petrol was pretty cheap compared to NZ, but we saw one vehicle fill up with $700 worth of petrol!

Emus... not in the wild however, in a pen at a roadside stop

Emus… not in the wild however, in a pen at a roadside stop

The road to Uluru was not as major as the Stuart Highway, so the speed limit was a little lower and the next stage of the trip took a long time. Suddenly, Tim from the front seat yelled out “is that it?” claiming to have spotted Uluru…. turns out it wasn’t, it was actually Mt Campbell, and not quite as impressive. Eventually the real thing came into sight and the end of the road trip to Yulara (the main town at Uluru). It was pretty good to get out the car, with 5 of us and our gear tightly packed in plus 24 hours of racing in our weary legs and the DOMS starting to set in.

That evening it was off to have a look at this great big rock. I can confirm that it is very red and very big and quite impressive, both from a short distance and close up. The weary legs also got a good workout on a short walk (~1km) that felt like a very long tough walk around the base. Viewing it at sunset was obviously one of the things to do when there, so we joined in with the hundreds of other tourists in the allocated and well marked area for doing so. These Aussies know how to do tourism en masse, maybe NZ could learn a thing or too!

As night fell we moved into our tents for what was a very cold, and noisy night. There is not a lot of power lines out there spanning the desert so each major place seems to have their own source of power in the form of a generator. These run all night long and are quite loud… probably just as well so that we couldn’t hear Dingo’s prowling about, but loud enough to disrupt sleep! We planned to get up early to go to watch sunrise, also along with the hundreds of other tourists, so when it came time to get up and go, no one was complaining too much about the early start.

Sunrise unfortunately wasn’t fantastic, still pretty cool though and I think probably worth watching….cold though very cold! Next on the schedule for the afternoon was a visit to Kata Tjuta, another series of big rocks nearby. Here we ran into another bunch of orienteers/rogainers and went on a walk through the valley of the winds. This was quite a spectacular walk, quite different rocks, and in some ways more interesting than Uluru. We set out on this leisurely walk in the heat of the day, which wasn’t too bad to begin with but in and around the rocks in the sun it got quite hot. Shade was our friend, the sun and the rocky terrain was not. My feet were still quite sore from the Rogaine so it was a bit of a suffer-fest for the most part. I can see why when its over 36 degC the track is closed! It was a little over 20 and I was quite uncomfortable!

It was a relief to take some shelter, and have some lunch back at the car park. Lunch wasn’t entirely what I would call appetising, it consisted of eating left over food from a combination of traveling and the rogaine! After absolutely cooking in the sun 10mins earlier, I had to move out of the shade because I was starting to get so cold, such was the contrast of the temperature and humidity of the place.

Mid afternoon, and it was time to head back towards Alice Springs in anticipation of our flights home the next morning. Darkness fell not long before we hit the Stuart Highway again, driving in the dark was not recommended in the Northern Territory. This is due to an increased chance of hitting Kangaroos, Camels or other large beasts which seem to roam about the roads at night, however it seemed the scariest  things out there were the Road Trains. Very long and scary things to pass….

Desolate Roadside stop

Desolate Roadside stop

Road trip...not a road trip, its the Rogaine map and Tim doing some serious post race analysis

Road trip…not a road map, its the Rogaine map and Tim doing some serious post race analysis

About 80kms from Alice Springs we pulled into Stuarts well for the highlight of the trip: Camping out an Outback Roadside stop. We took the free option, a dusty red paddock, right near the generator… the dust was not ideal for tent pegs either, a slight issue for tents that require pegs to help them stay up!  All of us were fairly tired from our big 7km walk and travelling in general, so the noise of the generator and some distant dingo howling didn’t stop most of us sleeping for the first few hours. Then around 3am a confused roster started crowing, the full moon came out, and it got much much colder. I think we all felt it was a relief when the alarms went off for another early start. Georgia and I had earlier flights than the others which forced us to get up and go early, but everyone was happy to be back in the warm car and out of there as soon as possible.

Camping in the desert, one of the highlights of the trip!

Camping in the desert, one of the highlights of the trip!

There was plenty of time to do some serious repacking at the airport, ensuring the tent and other gear was soil and plant free, before making an epic serious of flights, taking all day, first to Adelaide, then Brisbane and finally home to Christchurch.

 

24 hours with Tim

The time had come, after a moderately frantic day of packing and preparation, we were on the road to the Ross River Resort to collect our race information and finally the maps so we could plan our route. Just like everyone else we had the maps in our hands with 3 hours of planning ahead of us followed by the race start at 12pm.

First of the map was huge, we knew it was going to be big but at around A1 (8xA4!) we started to wonder if we really needed a survival blanket as well! Managing the map on the go was going to be tough. We only had a rough idea of what the terrain was like so we decided on a realtively conservative route, covering around 85km, straightline, between controls and water stops. Water stops during the first day were going to be essential to our success as Tim seems to operate on a lot of water, and in the middle of winter in the desert it was only going to be a comfortable 20-odd degrees with minimal relative humidity… Our plan took us through the upper Spinifex area during the afternoon, then covering the eastern side of the map at night, finishing with a short jaunt into the southern Spinifex belt, with a number options on the way home to the Hash house depending on how things were going.

Fence crossing under pressure

Fence crossing under pressure

Somehow the three hours of planning evaporated and we were lining up on the start line ready for 24 hours in the desert. 700+ people were with us on the start-line as we got underway, which was not as manic as I thought it would be! Quickly we had to make a decision whether or not to get our feet wet. I made the decision for us and chose to keep them dry. I think it was probably a good choice in hindsight as wet feet in the dry desert is more than likely a recipe for some good blisters. It was pretty much instantly hot as soon as we were running, and with a heavy pack full of food and water I felt like I was suffering from quite early on. I had been eating pretty solidly all morning and I don’t think my food had enough time to settle down, either that or it was nerves.

First control down and the rush was still on, with teams racing around all over the place. Eventually once we were heading up hill I was able to take the lead on the Navigation for a brief moment leading us into the second one in the lead of our little group. Tim then managed to get stung by what he thought was a bee. Fortunately it wasn’t anything too serious and after just over 30mins into the race we were at our first water stop. I had one bottle to fill up, but I was unsure how much water I had in my hydration bladder and on advice from Tim, decided (unwisely) not to fill up.

Across the Bridge

Across the Bridge

The next two hours I managed to settle down and get into the race. We entered the first spinifex patch which turned out to be much worse than the model and lived up to everything we had been told about it! I was grateful for my goretex shoes and my gaiters that stopped the majority of the spikes. I slowly began to run out of water, Tim on the other

hand still had quite a bit, enough to lend me until at least the next waterstop. However the Spinifex had slowed us down enough that we were starting to slow down a bit and slip on our schedule. As the sun began to lower we decided to make our first modification to the course, dropping or swapping a 100 pointer to get to the Waterstop faster! In the two hours since running out of water, Tim had also run out and at the hottest part of the afternoon too. It was desperate times in the last hour of daylight rationing a tiny amount of water, just enough to allow us to traipse into the All night cafe and waterstop right on darkness.

Water (and electrolyte) had never tasted so good. I drank probably close to a litre straight away, then filling my pack with approximately 3.6L before leaving. By now it was dark and after having some water and a quick snack from the all night cafe it was like a whole new race. I focused on drinking for the next hour as we collected a few controls before hitting the next water stop. Over that hour I had managed to drink another 1.6L and set myself up for the long night ahead.

Being close to the tropics and the middle of winter there was something like 13hours of darkness. Because of the quality of the map, navigating in the dark was quite simple as long as you kept in contact. Tim pulled off a couple of slick maneuvers in this section, insisting that going straight up and down the spurs was the best method of getting across the terrain. I think it was because of his Hoka’s (Shoes with a lot of cushioning, not very tolerant for sidling). I slipped into a bit of down spot there for a while and I wasnt very good at backing Tim up, allowing a mistake or two to slip in… We continued on however, still racking up a good number of controls.

There was no midnight party, just me and Tim and a couple of Jetplanes in a riverbed in the top corner of the map at the 12 hour mark. We were still on target with our plan, still following it closely, but we chose to drop a 110 point control to avoid a significant amount of climb, and when for a road/riverbed bash. I was not happy here, my feet started to hurt, it was the witching hour and I was not having fun running/walking without having to navigate.

The water stop was quite welcome, Tim had given up trying to force me to eat, and I had got onto my own eating schedule, which made me feel much better. I still had a lot of water in my pack so only filled up my bottle to Tim’s disgust, but by now I was starting to feel the weight of my pack was affecting my speed. The long flatish legs were numbing my mind, and I was in need of some inspiration, nothing really came, until we made a bit of a mistake by just not being confident in where we were. After a pitstop, we were both back in the game.

Dawn finally came and the long night came to an end. Another milestone passed and a little closer to the finish. Here we managed to catch up with Phil and Rob, which was possibly the highlight of the race, and ran with them for a while. Once at the control we went our separate ways as we decided to drop a 90 pointer to ensure we were going to traverse the map fast enough to get back in time. The way we had planned our course, we had left the most significant climb to the last bit, which was not kind on our feet. I hindsight I think I probably should have had more electrolyte to drink at this point as I slipped back into a bad patch. Poor Tim had to deal with me complaining, me worrying that we were not going to get back on time and navigate while ensuring we were still scoring at a decent rate. He made sure we stuck to the plan and carried my pack for a bit too.

The next few hours the heat started to build again, and my feet (and brain) began to struggle. Until we had made it into the Southern Spinifex belt I was still worried we were not going to get back in time. But sure enough we were going to make it back in time, in fact with time to spare. I was completely hating life going down this horrible dry and hot valley, and struggled to run/walk/jog to the water stop. I told Tim at this water stop there was no way I could make it up to the 60 pointer near the end. But after getting some electrolyte down me, and Tim taking my pack I reluctantly accepted the challenge from Tim to go and get the 60 points. I even managed to run.

Yet again we defied my predictions and had plenty of time to get back. Unfortunately by this point we were now out of range of any easy points. After the drink stop I had found a second wind, and maybe the finishline fever/thought of being able to stop had grown ever closer, and I could take my pack back and managed even a sprint to the finish, to race Rob and Phil right to the end!

Sprint to the finish

Sprint to the finish

We finished well, Tim did a fantastic job of holding our race together when I was suffering big time out there, but we stuck to our guns and completed most of our planned route. I felt bad for sucking so much out there, but I guess in a team of two someone is always going to be feeling better than the other one, and this time it happened to be Tim for a change! To finish 5th was fairly satisfying, unfortunately we were only 50 points of 4th place over all and 1 place of making the Open mens grade podium.

Results

Once again huge thanks to Bivouac/Outdoor for your help and support and in getting me prepared for the race!

Not long to go…

Tomorrow morning we will be heading from Alice Springs to the Ross River Resort to complete the planning and final preparations for the World Rogaine Champs which kick off at 12pm on Saturday (ACST).

Flying across the Desert to Alice Springs

Flying across the Desert to Alice Springs

On Wednesday, after a very short sleep myself and half of the NZ contingent was flying out to Alice Springs. Not afraid to take different routes, we all took wild variations in route choices to get here, via Auckland, Brisbane, Melbourne, Sydney and Adelaide just to name a few!

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The Rogaine terrain

Tim and I had a run around the model course on Thursday in the intense heat with a whole lot of other kiwis. It was pretty interesting, the Spinifex grass was not as bad as we believed it would be and the rocks were much worse! It is some cool terrain though, nothing like I have run in before. The closest thing I could think of was Bannockburn or Naseby (but with very sharp rocks which destroyed Tim’s big ugly Hoka’s).

Here is a short video for your amusement: